Oscar Vault Monday – Random Harvest, 1942 (dir. Mervyn LeRoy)

Published July 28, 2017 by kitlat

I saw this movie during TCM’s Star Of The Month at thon night of Ronald Colman. Though I pointed out that some of what transpired were not really plot twists if you watch soaps at some point, it’s still worth the ride.

the diary of a film history fanatic

I first saw this movie a few years back on TCM and it destroyed me. I saw it recently at the Castro Theatre and I guess I had forgotten a few things about it because there were whole plot twists I didn’t remember and it destroyed me all over again. If you haven’t seen this film before, beware I will be discussing some of the film’s major plot twists. Random Harvest came out the same year as arguably Greer Garson’s most famous film – Mrs. Miniver – as such, she was nominated (an won) Best Actress for playing the titular role in that film, and was ineligible to be nominated for her performance in this film. Regardless, the film was nominated for seven Academy Awards, though it failed to win any: Best Score, Best B&W Art Direction, Best Writing Screenplay (this was a third category, and is not analogous to the Best Original or  Best Adapted Screenplay categories…

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Tears and Trauma at the Circus: The Hartford Circus Fire

Published July 8, 2017 by kitlat

It seems that in the midst of “Everything Trump,” New England has been quietly marking the anniversary of this event, which happened so very long ago. Those who survived that are still left alive are well nigh in their 80s and must now rely on generations so far removed from this tragedy to tell this story. This person, environzentinel63, has done quite a great job of it.

ASPire

The city was in festive mood.   The Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus had arrived at last.  It was still wartime and the citizens of the Connecticut capital needed a diversion.  At that time the only entertainment to rival it was the cinema.  Those who chose to go there instead on that incredibly hot Thursday afternoon would be the fortunate ones.

Hartford has witnessed a number of terrible events in its long history but this would be the most heartbreaking of all.  Many of those who survived that tragic day are still alive as they were children at the time.

Circuses are no longer very popular, partly because of the plethora of alternative entertainment today and partly because of the cramped and unnatural conditions under which wild animals have been kept in order to supply oohs and aahs to a paying audience.  They spend their lives cooped up in cages…

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June 5, 2014: What’s the deal with Archie Andrews?

Published June 26, 2017 by kitlat

And now there’s Riverdale the tv series. I can say that in MY version of the Archie Universe, Valerie would never be in a relationship with a loser like Archie.

Josephmallozzi's Weblog

Seriously?  What the heck is going on here?  Last time I read I checked in on the gang from Riverdale, these were the type of shenanigans they were getting into:

1And then, somewhere along the line, things took a darker turn for Archie Andrews (or, one could argue, a lighter turn for Frank Castle) and we got this:

ArchiePunisherSuddenly, our Archie had grown up.  Instead of just hanging around Pop Tate’s Pop Shoppe or toying with Betty and Veronica’s emotions, he was suddenly running afoul of crazed, gun-toting vigilantes…

Archie Punisher 2And then, eventually, after 67 years of straddling the fence, Archie finally made up his mind and decided between Betty and Veronica choosing…

archie-124e2b81f85e803af3cb83c8e11d4bbc14b6589f-s6-c30The bad girl.  So decided – FINALLY – he married Veronica…

1Or, wait, maybe it was Betty…

1Or both of those stories took place in an alternate universe so he could continue dating both in addition to her…

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“The Future of Ballet in the City Looks Exciting and Vital to the Next Generation,” Says Bethany Kingsley-Garner

Published June 8, 2017 by kitlat

I love a great ballet dancer interview. This post from Ballet In The City balances the right amount of text and imagery. The questions don’t make you roll your eyes either. Call me jealous. Or Ishmael. Just don’t call me Betty or Al.

balletinthecity

image4 (2) Scottish Ballet Principal Ballerina Bethany Kingsley-Garner. Photo by Rimbaud Patron

Bethany Kingsley-Garner learned of her promotion to Principal with the Scottish Ballet while onstage, and calls it one of the most memorable moments of her career. “Hearing the audience applaud with tears streaming down my face, it’s a moment that will last forever,” she said of the occasion. During her question and answer session, Kingsley-Garner discussed not only her on-stage promotion, but other major career milestones, her excitement to work with Ballet in the City, and walked us through a normal day in the life of a professional dancer.

bethanykgBallet in the City: Let’s start with learning a little about how your dancing career got started. How old were you when you began dancing ballet, and what initially sparked your interest in ballet?

Bethany Kinglsey-Garner: From as young as I can remember, we had classical music playing at home. My…

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The Word Is ‘Nemesis’: The Fight to Integrate the National Spelling Bee

Published June 6, 2017 by kitlat

It’s funny that it wasn’t all that long ago when people of color couldn’t participate in the National Spelling Bee, much less win.

Longreads

Cynthia R. Greenlee | Longreads | June 2017 | 2,900 words ( 12 minutes)

In 1962, teenager George F. Jackson wrote a letter to President John F. Kennedy with an appeal: “I am a thirteen-year-old colored boy and I like to spell. Do you think you could help me and get the Lynchburg bee opened to all children?”

The long road to the National Spelling Bee has always begun with local contests, often sponsored by a local newspaper. Nine publications, organized by the Louisville, Kentucky Courier-Journal, banded together in 1925 to create the first National Bee in Washington, D.C.

Decades later, George Jackson was protesting the policies of the local newspaper that sponsored the Lynchburg, Virginia contest, which excluded black students from participating in the official local competition — the necessary step that might send a lucky, word-loving Lynchburg child to nationals. There was more at stake than a…

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‘Crinolinemania’ and Oscar Wilde’s Tragic Half-Sisters

Published October 31, 2016 by kitlat

Huh. Reminds me of the death in the 1840s of ballerina Emma Livry, who died from burns incurred when she danced too close to the gaslamps.

This was a thing.  I found this as I read about ballet dancers in the mid-19th century.

Beside Every Man

Today, I came across a fascinating article on ‘Crinolinemania’, which mentioned the danger of fire and suggested that 3,000 British women died in a ten year period when their crinoline dresses caught fire. Included in the fatalities from crinoline fires at this time were Oscar Wilde’s half-sisters, Emily and Mary.

CRINOLINES

On Halloween night, 31 October 1871, Emily and Mary Wilde, half-sisters to Oscar, attended a ball at Drumaconnor House in County Monaghan. Towards the end of the evening, Andrew Nicholl Reid, their host, invited Emily to take a last turn around the floor. As they waltzed past an open fireplace, Emily’s crinoline dress brushed against the embers and caught alight. When Mary rushed to her sister’s aid, she managed to set her own dress on fire in the attempt.

Eyewitness reports suggest that Reid wrapped his coat around Emily and attempted to extinguish the flames by rolling her on the ground…

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